Ghosts and Gouls

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It’s All Hallow’s Eve and there is great excitement in our house.

We have had two days of pumpkin carving, costumes bought, soup made, and the obligatory visit to the local farm for Instagram purposes done and dusted.

I love this time of year. Three of my babies are Autumn born, so it’s a busy few weeks, and memory evoking of cuddling up in front of a roaring fire with a newborn in arms.

With the clocks going back an hour last weekend, the evenings are drawing in much earlier, and although we all carry a personal alarm all year round, as way of routine now, I am even more vigilant during the colder months.

Trick or Treating is becoming more popular and a bigger event in the UK each year, and I instil our safety tips in my girls, so thought, while sitting here with my spiced latte, watching my youngest make her first Pumpkin Pie, I’d share them with you ahead of tomorrow night.

Stay in groups (no wandering off alone)
Costumes should be flame resistant
Always carry a personal alarm
Remember to look both ways when crossing the street
Examine all treats before eating

Stay on the pavements when possible
Avoid dark houses
Flashlights to see the way, and glow sticks to make children more visible
Enjoy!

The good news is there are still a few hours left of our Halloween Offer. 20% off all of our safety products. Just enter code Halloween at check out http://www.safe-girl.co.uk

Happy Halloween!`

Is Personal Safety An Outdated, Anti-feminist idea?

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I’ve been doing a bit of soul-searching recently and pondering my stance on personal safety.

Having always considered myself a feminist (I was brought up on the belief that if we consider men and women as equals we are feminist – surely we all should be then?) I am particularly interested in the increasingly popular idea that instead of telling women to avoid being harassed, maybe we should tell men to stop harassing?

Yes – I know men are abused, harassed, raped too! But the facts are that 20% of women in England alone have experienced sexual harassment, compared with 4% of men, and over 98% of perpetrators are male, so for now, please indulge me.

The glaringly obvious personal problem I have with taking the view that we, as women, should carry on regardless, taking no safety precautions, and expecting all sexual predators to stop, is that I would go out of business. Women’s Safety is after all, how I survive.  But beyond that, I am a mother of four daughters. Do I feel comfortable allowing them to just go for it? Give up their personal alarms? Walk alone down dark alleys? Accept lifts from strangers?

My answer is a definite no! In an ideal world, of course we wouldn’t have to worry about how other people are going to behave towards us. Whether or not our drink will be spiked by a rape drug. And I really don’t bow down to the idea of changing the way we dress, or the advice by the police to join a running club and not go running alone. That would be my idea of hell – trying to keep up with other joggers and without my earphones!

Yes, the emphasis should be on controlling the would be assailants, rather than victims (male or female), and the advice to not go out alone, or not wear certain outfits is beyond outdated.

But anything more radical and gung ho seems to be throwing all caution to the wind and in my eyes, a little irresponsible.

There always has been, and always will be, a threat to women, AND to men, in the form of other, ill-intentioned people. So surely a few cautionary adjustments in the form of being aware, carrying a rape alarm, and only using licensed taxis, are more common sense than a big step backwards for women’s rights?

That’s my thought anyway?